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Open Eyes 096 04-20-15 The Mind, Autism and More

Open Eyes Podcast

 

 

Listen to this episode by clicking the Play Button above.

 

You can also listen to this episode at Late Night In The Midlands.

 

We are told many things about the brain, by everyone from scientists to religious figures. But does anyone really know how it works?

We discuss this topic, as well as some of the weird things that happen with the brain, AND EXTENSIVELY give a viewpoint of exactly how Autism looks, feels and works from the perspective of those whom are Autistic.

All this and more on this MUST LISTEN episode of Open Eyes!

LISTEN LIVE: http://bit.ly/1y2LeN0 OR http://bit.ly/1I7EJZH

 

 

The following are the show notes used to record this episode.  They are here for your reference and convenience.

 

 

NEWS:

The mother had plenty of arguments as to why her 10-year-old daughter should not receive the measles vaccine — ranging from “most diseases today are very rare” to “unmistakable links” between vaccines and severe reactions.

Problem was, Brantford Superior Court Justice R. John Harper wasn’t buying any of it.

He recently ruled that the girl, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, be given a vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, or whatever else her family doctor recommends, prior to her trip to Germany later this month to visit extended family.

By ruling that vaccination is in the best interests of the child, Harper was siding with the girl’s father, who is separated from the mother and shares joint custody, as well as with the overwhelming scientific evidence that has proven the effectiveness and extremely low risk of the measles vaccine.

“The parents are at the extreme end of high conflict and their positions relative to the issue of vaccinations is equally polarized,” Harper wrote.

The April 10 decision comes amid a recent measles outbreak that swept through North America, including Ontario, which Harper acknowledged “is at the centre of the controversy before this court.”

“This case shows the courts sensibly disdain those with a blind spot for science, whether it be denying that vaccines work, or denying that the earth is round,” said Amir Attaran, a law and medicine professor at the University of Ottawa.

Norway will shut down FM radio in the country beginning in 2017, Radio.no reports. The Norwegian Ministry of Culture finalized a shift date this week, making it the first country to do away with FM radio entirely. The country plans to transition to Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) as a national standard.

A statement released this week by the Ministry of Culture confirms a switch-off date that was proposed by the Norwegian government back in 2011. The government has concluded that the country is capable of meeting all the requirements necessary for a smooth transition to digital.

“Listeners will have access to more diverse and pluralistic radio-content, and enjoy better sound quality and new functionality,” Minister of Culture Thorhild Widvey said in a statement. “Digitization will also greatly improve the emergency preparedness system, facilitate increased competition and offer new opportunities for innovation and development.”

DAB currently offers 22 national channels as opposed to FM’s five, and has the capacity to host almost 20 more. The cost of transmitting radio channels through FM is also eight times higher than the cost of DAB transmission, the ministry reports.

Eating eggs this way has extra nutritious benefits. (Photo: Getty Images)

While the egg yolk debate (to eat or not to eat) may continue among doctors, nutritionists and others in the health industry, researchers from Purdue University are giving the whole egg the thumbs up.

In fact, they’ve discovered that eggs consumed with raw vegetables can actually increase the nutritional value of the veggies.

This study, which was presented earlier this month at the American Society for Nutrition’s Annual Meeting, consisted of 16 healthy young men who were instructed to eat three different salads — one with no egg, one with one-and-a-half scrambled whole eggs and another with three scrambled whole eggs. “And what we observed was that there was a progressive increase in the absorption of the carotenoids from the vegetables as you had more eggs, which we attribute to the fat component of the yolk,” lead study author Wayne Campbell, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition science at Purdue University, tells Yahoo Health.

The carotenoids — which are naturally-occurring pigments in plants that the body converts into antioxidants — found in the salad used in this study included beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. The latter two nutrients are found in egg yolk, as well. The salad was made with tomatoes, shredded carrots, baby spinach, romaine lettuce and Chinese wolfberry.

Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work on Wednesday underscored growing concerns about potential threats to key military and intelligence satellites, and said the U.S. government needed innovative and integrated ways to respond to any such attacks.

Work told a classified session at the annual Space Symposium conference that space assets were “absolutely critical” to the U.S. military’s ability to operate and fight future wars, and the Pentagon would take action to defend those assets, according to his spokeswoman, Lieutenant Commander Courtney Hillson.

Work said government and industry needed to work together to find innovative ways to protect satellites and the networks used to operate them, she said.

“We depend on space for everything from space-based communications, to intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance to positioning, navigation and timing,” she said Work told 200 military and industry executives.

Work also said it was important to emphasize control of space assets as challenges arose, and that the U.S. government needed to respond in an integrated and coordinated manner if an adversary targeted those systems and capabilities.
 Admiral James Winnefeld told Reuters last month that the U.S. military was taking a broader look at the overall issue of “space control,” but provided no further details.

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